e-newsletter
digital edition
product info
advertise
Mcgraw Hill Construction
comment

News:

EU May Be Underestimating Biofuels GWP

By Evan Dick

This article originally appeared on BuildingGreen.com

December 13, 2011
Soybeans, shown being harvested here, are a common biofuel crop. A committee of scientists has questioned the way in which the European Union has calculated CO2 reductions from the use of biofuels.
Photo © P. Blackford
Soybeans, shown being harvested here, are a common biofuel crop. A committee of scientists has questioned the way in which the European Union has calculated CO2 reductions from the use of biofuels.
----- Advertising -----

A committee of 19 scientists and academics has issued a draft opinion for the European Environment Agency criticizing the European Union’s method for calculating reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from the use of biofuels. They charge that the European Union has failed to fully take into account the carbon sequestration and storage potential of land left in its natural state instead of being repurposed to grow biofuels.

For example, if a forest is replaced with a biofuel crop, the carbon emission reductions associated with using biofuels instead of fossil fuels would be compromised by the lost carbon storage and sequestration potential of the preexisting forest. While this example may represent an extreme case, any land repurposed for biofuel production must take into account the previous land use’s carbon sequestration and storage potential to accurately predict the reduction in GWP from biofuel use.

This finding could ultimately result in a reduction in forecasts for the amount of environmentally viable energy available from biofuel crops in the future—something that could impact climate change models as well as farmers and businesses currently investing in biofuel production. To read the committee’s ”Opinion on Greenhouse Gas Accounting in Relation to Bioenergy,” go to www.eea.europa.eu.

Copyright 2011 by BuildingGreen Inc.

Keywords:

 Reader Comments:

Sign in to Comment

To write a comment about this story, please sign in. If this is your first time commenting on this site, you will be required to fill out a brief registration form. Your public username will be the beginning of the email address that you enter into the form (everything before the @ symbol). Other than that, none of the information that you enter will be publically displayed.

We welcome comments from all points of view. Off-topic or abusive comments, however, will be removed at the editors’ discretion.
----- Advertising -----
Click here to go to product info Page
Daily Headlines
Sweets, Search Building Products
Search
Reader Feedback
Most Commented Most Recommended
Rankings reflect comments made in the past 14 days
Rankings reflect comments made in the past 14 days
Recently Posted Reader Photos

View all photo galleries >>
Recent Forum Discussions

View all forum discusions >>